As and Like

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Try an exercise about 'as' and 'like' here.

As
1: 'As' can mean 'because'. 2: 'As' can mean 'while' or 'at the same time': 3: We can use 'as' to talk about the way one thing is similar to another thing. In this case too, 'as' is a conjunction and needs to be followed by a subject and a verb or by a prepositional phrase. Sometimes we invert the subject and the verb in a formal style. 4: We need to use 'as' with expressions like 'as much as' and by 'as adjective as'. This is also talking about similarity. These expressions can be followed by a subject and a verb or a noun or preposition. 5: 'As' can be used with a noun to show someone's position. This is especially common with jobs. In a similar way, 'as' can also be used to show something's function (what we are using it for). It must be followed by a noun. Watch out! You can't use 'like' for someone's real job. You need to use 'as'. Like
1: 'Like' can be used to give examples. It means the same as 'for example' and is usually followed by nouns or pronouns. 2: We can also use 'like' to talk about how one thing is similar to another thing. Here 'like' is a preposition and is followed by a noun or a pronoun. When we're talking about how things are similar, we often use 'like' with verbs such as 'look', 'sound' and 'smell'. Traditionally, 'like' needed to be followed by a noun. However, in modern English, we often use 'like' as a conjunction and so it is followed by a subject and a verb. Some people think this is not correct, but it's very common. 'Like' vs 'as' for similarity
Often, we can use both 'as' and 'like' to talk about similarity. We need to follow 'as' with a clause (a subject and a verb). When we use 'as' for similarity, it's not followed by a noun or pronoun. However, when we use 'as' to mean a role or job (it's followed by a noun in this case), then we can't use 'like'. Instead, 'like' is talking about similarity. Here's another example. Try an exercise about 'as' and 'like' here.
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'A' and 'The' Explained